Posted by: Cornwall Community Museum | August 13, 2014

FIRST WORLD WAR – COMMUNICATING TO THE HOME FRONT

“Whiz Bang
Field service postcards were nicknamed “whiz bangs” after German shells that “whizzed” past and then “bang” when they landed and arrived with little warning.

The field service postcards provided an easy way for soldiers to keep in touch with loved ones when there was little down time to write a letter. Writers erased any phrases that were not required.  They were warned that any additional information would result in the card being destroyed by military censors.  They had to sign their name, not print and could not add anything to it.    Although the Whiz Bangs were limited in what they could say,  they gave loved-ones back home some peace of mind just to receive any kind of correspondence from the front.

wizz bang

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Cornwall Industry

A Cornwall Community Museum Blog

Streets of Cornwall

Pitt St. and Beyond

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A Cornwall Community Museum Publication

Cornwall Community Museum

In The Wood House at the waterfront, Cornwall, Ontario, Canada

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